AMERICAN GALLERY

Greatest American Painters

Will Hicok Low (1853 – 1932)

Posted by L. A. on February 4, 2010


An Arcadian Pool

Dolce Far Niente

Nude In A Forest

The Elysian Lawn

My Lady’s Eyes

Purple And Gold

Spring Fountain

Skipper Ireson’s Ride

Allegory Of Autumn

Allegory Of Winter

Christmas Morn

Love Disarmed

Goddess Of The Harvest

Self-Portrait At Montigny

Aurora

4 Responses to “Will Hicok Low (1853 – 1932)”

  1. Roy G. Poulsen said

    I have Picture which I believe its a halfone it depicts cupid in a row boat on a shore line of a lake with a man sitting and 2 women sitting and 1 women standing I’m fairly sure its Wil H Lows work. But can find anything about it or any picture of it on the internet. We found the framed picture in the attic of the house we bought in 1995. The glass has air bubbles so I’m guessing its 80 90 years old. Do you know the name of it or anything about it. From my research it seems he did about 1000 different pictures like this.

  2. Diane said

    I have a Will H Low print of nude male gazing at his reflection in a pond. Can you tell me the name of it? It’s dated 1891 and shows his signature.

  3. vincenzo said

    Although in his portrait, executed in impressionistic style, he has portrait himself in a likeness to Paul Gauguin (his contemporary), for the his painting in the neoclassical style, Will Hicok Low is by to consider, in my opinion, much in contrast, with the new European artistic movements of his time, that they were completely revolutionizing the way of understanding art.
    Evidently, W.H. Low was very worried by the new ideas that were borning in environments European artists, who, he was thinking, were destroying the great past of classical art.
    In opposed at revolutionary fervor, he thought, probably, that the only way to save the beautiful painting, was that to direct the attention to the classical tradition. And in this sense, I think, Low was hoped that the American art follow a path independent from that of Europe of his day, taking as model the classical art.

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