AMERICAN GALLERY

Greatest American Painters

Abe Weiner (1917 – 1993)

Posted by A. S. Amberson on May 1, 2014


Remembrance

Remembrance

Survival

Survival

Monday Washday

Monday Washday

The Old And The New

The Old And The New

Of Ants And Men

Of Ants And Men

Green Oasis

Green Oasis

Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh

The Hill District

The Hill District

Still Life

Still Life

Spring Composition

Spring Composition

Spring Landscape

Spring Landscape

View From Window

View From Window

Variations On A City

Variations On A City

untitled

untitled

Series: Summer

Series: Summer

Decay And Restoration

Decay And Restoration

The Sign Painter

The Sign Painter

City With Leaf

City With Leaf

Adam And Eve

Adam And Eve

Beam

Beam

Rose

Rose

Between Worlds

Between Worlds

Disintegration

Disintegration

Fall Leaf

Fall Leaf

Shell

Shell

Transitory Force

Transitory Force

Transient Worlds

Transient Worlds

String Quartet

String Quartet

Themes On A City

Themes On A City

official website

 

6 Responses to “Abe Weiner (1917 – 1993)”

  1. Vincenzo said

    In my opinion, Abe Weiner’s painting is a lovely genre of surrealism.

  2. Bruce said

    Sometimes I am frustrated here because I do not have the artistic expertise to pinpoint and properly phrase what I want to say about certain artwork. This is a prime example. I will try anyway but of course what I am going to say will sound trite and simplistic.

    First, every single one of these paintings is interesting. By that, I don’t just mean attracting and holding one’s interest. What I mean is, each one makes you stop and think about what is being shown, not shown, partially shown, or merely hinted at. Why is the artist combining these images? Ok, that one is obvious – the combinations are meant to be thought-provoking and may contain actual messages – but it’s more than that.

    For example, why did he choose to blend (and I mean blend, not just juxtaposition) certain images in certain ways? Why are some objects tilted, angled, or curved (like the tree growing out of the rock with leaves and limbs blending into matching clouds)? Why does he position certain things (like the cityscape seen through an opening in rock that resembles an ant hole)?

    Why is Pittsburgh floating in air? Why are tiny houses dominated by vague, looming skyscrapers in the background, sized out of proportion? The monumental animal skull that dwarfs village ruins indicates something the painter had in mind, but what about the very large leaf? Speaking of leaf, look at the way it wraps around those homes – protecting or menacing? And is that a shell or an eye?

    And the way these are done, the technique and the subject matter displayed, are intriguing.

    Every one of these paintings is a keeper for me. I just wish I could explain better as to why.

  3. Vincenzo said

    I agree with Briam, about the many questions that elicit these paintings, which, to me, that he could respond only to the author, if he were still alive. When the observer is confronted with surreal works, with scenarios lend themselves to various interpretations, usually asks: “What do you mean the artist?”. According to me you should know a little about psychology, because so many things come into play related all’incoscio artist. Often these are ideas taken from his dreams, but it could also be a state of trance, very common in certain artists. In this regard, I am reminded of an anecdote about Dali, when at the beginning of the thirties of last century, he made an exhibition of his paintings in a gallery in London. Among the guests there was also Freud, who was asked for an opinion as a psychoanalyst, and he replied: “This man definitely has problems.”

  4. Kim Weiner said

    Hi Suzay,
    I was just checking back about Abe Weiner?. I realize you are busy, but how soon do you think you might get to him?

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.

 
%d bloggers like this: