AMERICAN GALLERY

Greatest American Painters

Thomas Sully (1783 – 1872)

Posted by L. A. on May 21, 2014


The Passage Of The Delaware

The Passage Of The Delaware

Mary Ann Heide Norris

Mary Ann Heide Norris

Elizabeth Wharton (Mrs. William J. McCluney)

Elizabeth Wharton (Mrs. William J. McCluney)

Mrs. Katherine Matthews

Mrs. Katherine Matthews

Mrs. John Mason And Her Son

Mrs. John Mason And Her Son

Misses Mary And Emily McEuen - The McEuen Sisters

Misses Mary And Emily McEuen – The McEuen Sisters

Ellen and Mary McIllvain

Ellen and Mary McIllvain

Mrs. James Montgomery Jr

Mrs. James Montgomery Jr

Mother And Child

Mother And Child

Mother And Son

Mother And Son

Elizabeth Waldsworth (Mrs. Charles Augustus Murray)

Elizabeth Waldsworth (Mrs. Charles Augustus Murray)

Musidora

Musidora

Mrs. Caleb Newbold And Son

Mrs. Caleb Newbold And Son

The Neread Doto

The Neread Doto

Miss C. Parsons as The Lady Of The Lake

Miss C. Parsons as The Lady Of The Lake

Rembrandt Peale

Rembrandt Peale

Miss Pearce

Miss Pearce

Peasant Girl (after Rembrandt's Young Girl Leaning On A Windowsill)

Peasant Girl (after Rembrandt’s Young Girl Leaning On A Windowsill)

Thomas Handasyd Perkins

Thomas Handasyd Perkins

Prison Scene from J. Fenimore Cooper's The Pilot

Prison Scene from J. Fenimore Cooper’s The Pilot

Pocahontas

Pocahontas

Pocahontas

Pocahontas

Portia And Shylock

Portia And Shylock

Macbeth In The Witches' Cave

Macbeth In The Witches’ Cave

Zachariah Poulson

Zachariah Poulson

Henry Pratt

Henry Pratt

Mrs. Evan Poultney

Mrs. Evan Poultney

(4 – to be continued)

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2 Responses to “Thomas Sully (1783 – 1872)”

  1. Vincenzo said

    It is a neoclassical painter. Some works are certainly pleasing, such as the first painting that opens the series, while others leave to be desired. But to me personally, this painter gives the idea that he exaggerates a bit too much with the length of the necks of the ladies. It ‘s true that at that time we were holding very fashionable and elegance … but to every thing there is always a limit. I have to honestly say that the portrait of Elizabeth Wharton, leaves me very puzzled: the head of the lady seems completely foreign to the long neck, which should hold her up.

    • Vincenzo said

      With regard to the above, I would hazard a guess, not too far-fetched. It may be that Thomas Sully, except some of his paintings, preparing in advance of a series of paintings with busts of ladies depicted only up to the neck,
      so you can use and then for any woman, adding just the heads? Obviously this is just my hypothesis, but may help give a plausible explanation to the incredible disharmonies that characterize some paintings by Sully. I am of the opinion that Mrs. Elizabeth, which I mentioned before, when she is viewed portrayed so horribly, she must have refused the painting. Or, a painter did not have the courage to show it to that lady, preferring to keep it hidden in his atelier, it was not even the Mona Lisa! Ha, ha, ha … I’m kidding of course. Every now and then is good laugh …

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