AMERICAN GALLERY

Greatest American Painters

William Edouard Scott (1884 – 1964)

Posted by L. A. on January 6, 2014


Frederick Douglass Appealing To President Lincoln To Enlist Negroes

Frederick Douglass Appealing To President Lincoln To Enlist Negroes

Full Moon - Haitian Rhythm

Full Moon – Haitian Rhythm

Girls With Chicken

Girls With Chicken

Goodbye My Friend

Goodbye My Friend

Going To The Market, Haiti

Going To The Market, Haiti

Night Turtle Fishing

Night Turtle Fishing

Dr. Ulysses Grant Dailey

Dr. Ulysses Grant Dailey

Mother And Child

Mother And Child

Backyard

Backyard

The Daily Catch

The Daily Catch

When The Tide Is Out

When The Tide Is Out

A Young Woman

A Young Woman

Haitian Drum Player

Haitian Drum Player

The Maker Of Goblins

The Maker Of Goblins

Haitian Market

Haitian Market

Haitian Market

Haitian Market

Riding In The Country

Riding In The Country

Haitian Landscape

Haitian Landscape

Fountain Gate With Trees

Fountain Gate With Trees

Landscape With Haystacks, France

Landscape With Haystacks, France

Rainy Night, Etaples

Rainy Night, Etaples

The Orange Seller

The Orange Seller

America's Earliest Settlers

America’s Earliest Settlers

Mind, Body And Spirit (detail)

Mind, Body And Spirit (detail)

4 Responses to “William Edouard Scott (1884 – 1964)”

  1. Bruce said

    That is the worst depiction of Abraham Lincoln that I have ever seen without it being an outright caricature.

    • Suzay Lamb said

      About this work (a mural for the Recorder of Deeds Building in Washington, D.C.) you can read on Wikipedia:

      “In this mural, Douglass Appealing to President Lincoln, 1943, Scott tells the story of Douglass’ appeal for AfricanAmerican participation in the Union armies in the American Civil War. “Scott, in his manner of depicting the exchange between Lincoln and Douglass, suggests that the fiery orator is here the aggressive speaker. Whereas Douglass, hands extended slightly, shifts his weight forward while speaking to Lincoln, the president appears to avoid looking into Douglass’s eyes and concentrates on listening to his words”. Furthermore, the strewn and scattered papers on the desk and around the trashcan suggest urgency and desperation—and this was certainly the case. “The Civil War was proving much more difficult than the Union leadership had expected”. And while Douglass presents a possible solution to the president, it is far from ideal in Lincoln’s eyes. Many whites of this time didn’t believe that African Americans could be effective soldiers. Regardless, Douglass is undeniably the active part of this depiction, which again portrays African Americans as functioning members of society. This portrayal furthers the message inherent in the subject matter: African Americans could be equally as patriotic, and thus equally effective as soldiers, as any whites. Ironically, though—in the same manner as in Frederick Douglass—Douglass’ “blackness” is slightly downplayed yet again. Douglass’s skin appears barely darker than the shadowed parts of Lincoln’s. Thus, this painting serves as another example of Scott’s small step, though not a leap, in the direction of the New Negro movement.”

  2. Vincenzo said

    Bruce, I totally agree! Also to me it seems one of the worst portraits of Lincoln. It is truly a grotesque work. Perhaps the artist’s attention was more focused on the content of the scene, that not on the Lincoln’s physiognomy.

  3. Don Hyde said

    You guys get the drift but not the drifter………

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