AMERICAN GALLERY

Greatest American Painters

Gilbert Stuart (1755 – 1828)

Posted by A. S. Amberson on October 27, 2013


Captain Sir William Abdy

Captain Sir William Abdy

William Abercromby Of Glasgow

William Abercromby Of Glasgow

Arthur Acheson, 2nd Viscount 1st Earl Of Gosford

Arthur Acheson, 2nd Viscount 1st Earl Of Gosford

John Adams

John Adams

John Adams

John Adams

Abigail Adams

Abigail Adams

John Quincy Adams

John Quincy Adams

Louisa Catherine Johnson Adams (Mrs. John Quincy Adams)

Louisa Catherine Johnson Adams (Mrs. John Quincy Adams)

Fisher Ames

Fisher Ames

Joseph Anthony Jr

Joseph Anthony Jr

Mrs. Joseph Anthony Jr (Henrietta Hillegas)

Mrs. Joseph Anthony Jr (Henrietta Hillegas)

John Jacob Astor

John Jacob Astor

Commodore William Bainbridge

Commodore William Bainbridge

John Banister

John Banister

Christian Stelle Banister And Her Son, John

Christian Stelle Banister And Her Son, John

William Barker

William Barker

Catherine Lane Barker

Catherine Lane Barker

Colonel Isaac Barré

Colonel Isaac Barré

Admiral The Honourable Samuel Barrington

Admiral The Honourable Samuel Barrington

Richard Barrington

Richard Barrington

John Barry

John Barry

Ann Barry

Ann Barry

William Bayard

William Bayard

Miss Clementina Beach

Miss Clementina Beach

William Bingham

William Bingham

Anne Willing Bingham

Anne Willing Bingham

Mrs. Blades And Her Daughter

Mrs. Blades And Her Daughter

Jérome Bonaparte

Jérome Bonaparte

Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte

Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte

Kirk Boott

Kirk Boott

Thayendanegea (Joseph Brant)

Thayendanegea (Joseph Brant)

Joseph Brant

Joseph Brant

Governor John Brooks

Governor John Brooks

Reverend Joseph Stevens Buckminster

Reverend Joseph Stevens Buckminster

to be continued…

9 Responses to “Gilbert Stuart (1755 – 1828)”

  1. Thomas Jefferson said

    Che bruttina che è venuta Abigail in questo ritratto…Potrebbe quasi essere scambiata per una Hillary qualunque.

  2. christinaramosart said

    Suzay, I think you mean 1828, or he would have been almost 200 years old 🙂

    Date: Sun, 27 Oct 2013 16:11:45 +0000 To: artwithsoul@msn.com

  3. Bruce said

    I will not bore you (again) with a recitation of biographical information about these people, but I will mention that “Elizabeth Patterson Bonaparte (Baltimore, Maryland, 6 February 1785 – Baltimore, Maryland, 4 April 1879), known as ‘Betsy,’ was the daughter of a Baltimore, Maryland merchant, and was the first wife of Jérôme Bonaparte, and sister-in-law of Emperor Napoleon I of France.” Talk about rising through the social ranks!

    • Suzay Lamb said

      and here’s Jérome Bonaparte as a singer. Not to be missed!

      • Bruce said

        Ha ha ha! Where did you find this? I had no idea that it was a movie!

        Dick Powell (Bonaparte) stealing a kiss from Marion Davies (Patterson): “It’s your own fault for being so adorable.”

        Davies: “If I were a man, I’d thrash you.”

        Powell: “If you were a man, it wouldn’t have happened.”

        Ah, they don’t make them like that anymore! And Claude Rains as Napoleon. I have *got* to find this movie! 🙂

      • Bruce said

        Well, of course I found the trailer on TCM but goodness knows when they will air it again. Something tells me they’re not streaming it over on Netflix, either.

  4. Vincenzo said

    The fact that so many pupils and helpers of Gilbert Stuart, remained anonymous, I think it’s quite understandable. They were a sort of employees of the master, from whom they had learned well the painting technique, and helped him to complete the many portraits that were commissioned to him. The pupils of Stuart, also will have been very good technically, and certainly painted in the manner of their master. But we have to take into account one important thing, namely, that the learning of techniques, taken in isolation, is not enough to make a painter a great artist. It also takes a good personality together with inspiration and imagination.
    Probably the pupils of Stuart, of their own free choice, contented themselves just to learn the technique and style of the master, and of their work as employees, without to aspire to a career independently. The works that came out of the painting workshop of Stuart, though made partly or almost entirely by his pupils and collaborators, were rightly attributed to the master, because which works reflected one style of painting, which belonged to him, as a sort of mark.
    Surely he took care of the setting of the painting, of the drawing and the most important details, like the faces of the people depicted, then everything else him entrusting to his collaborators.
    Different is the case of his daughter Jane, who painted already when she was a little girl, and if she had been encouraged by her father to do other artistic knowledge, surely she could make much more progress in painting, without to stand firm at the only imitation of her father.

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