AMERICAN GALLERY

Greatest American Painters

Daniel F. Gerhartz (1965)

Posted by A. S. Amberson on October 1, 2013


Amaryllis

Amaryllis

title unknown

title unknown

October Glow

October Glow

Listening

Listening

title unknown

title unknown

As The Moon Rises

As The Moon Rises

Fragrance

Fragrance

title unknown

title unknown

Cameo

Cameo

Nana's Garden

Nana’s Garden

Gentle

Gentle

title unknown

title unknown

Tapestry

Tapestry

title unknown

title unknown

Indigo And Ivory

Indigo And Ivory

Girl And Horse

Girl And Horse

Into The Night

Into The Night

title unknown

title unknown

Looking Back

Looking Back

Flamenco

Flamenco

The Dance

The Dance

Dawn Of Hope

Dawn Of Hope

title unknown

title unknown

Quiet Waters

Quiet Waters

In The Orchard

In The Orchard

Together

Together

Celadon And Rose

Celadon And Rose

title unknown

title unknown

Timeless

Timeless

October

October

Italy

Italy

more paintings

© Daniel F. Gerhartz

official website

 

4 Responses to “Daniel F. Gerhartz (1965)”

  1. Bruce said

    Nice. Very nice. Did you think I could miss your choice of top painting? Thanks for remembering, if you did. Perhaps it was just coincidence. 🙂

  2. Bruce said

    Forgive me for cluttering up your blog with nonsense but these are just some of the highlights for me in this artist’s work:

    The direct, open, loving gaze in “Amaryllis.”

    The intense but far-away expression in “Listening.”

    The dreamy expression of “title unknown #1”.

    The youthful innocence of “Fragrance.”

    The wise-beyond-one’s-years look of “title unknown #2.”

    The beautifully shaped neck, shoulders, and arms of “Cameo.”

    The wisp of hair falling across her face in “Nana’s Garden.”

    The daintily uplifted pinky and ring finger in “Gentle.”

    The challenging stare of “Tapestry,” the ribbons framing her face and neck, the way her hand reaches into the basket for something unknown.

    The warm glow of the girls’ skin in “title unknown #4.”

    The matching coloration of “Girl And Horse” as if seen from within the heart of a girl who loves her horse.

    The grace that a woman can impart to a simple shawl in “Into The Night.”

    The downward glance of “Looking Back.” Is it a child? A dog? Um, an erstwhile bird or mouse? And gee, that is one fat cat.

    The stern looks of “Flamenco” and “The Dance” but in each a highly stylized and graceful gesture of the hand.

    The pensiveness of “Quite Waters.”

    The way the girl is balancing the basket on her hip in “Together.”

    The “October” sun radiating her hair from behind as she impatiently waits for your answer.

    The inviting loveliness of “Italy” (does she remind you of Juliette Binoche just a bit?).

    Yes, there is something quite definitely “Timeless” in all of this.

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