AMERICAN GALLERY

Greatest American Painters

Maxfield Parrish (1870 – 1966)

Posted by A. S. Amberson on February 27, 2013


Egypt

Egypt

Egypt

Egypt

The Lantern Bearers

The Lantern Bearers

Venetian Lamplighter

Venetian Lamplighter

A Venetian Night's Entertainment

A Venetian Night’s Entertainment

The Canyon

The Canyon

Griselda

Griselda

Jason And His Teacher

Jason And His Teacher

Lady Ursula Kneeling Before Pompdebile

Lady Ursula Kneeling Before Pompdebile

Lady Violetta And The Knave

Lady Violetta And The Knave

The Knave Watches Violetta Depart

The Knave Watches Violetta Depart

The Knave

The Knave

Jack And The Beanstalk

Jack And The Beanstalk

Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary

Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary

Puss In Boots

Puss In Boots

The Enchanted Prince

The Enchanted Prince

Air Castles

Air Castles

Princess Parizade Bringing Home The Singing Tree

Princess Parizade Bringing Home The Singing Tree

Ali Baba In The Cave Of 40 Thieves

Ali Baba In The Cave Of 40 Thieves

The Fisherman And The Genie

The Fisherman And The Genie

Sinbad Plotting To Kill The Genie

Sinbad Plotting To Kill The Genie

Young King Of The Black Isles

Young King Of The Black Isles

An Ancient Tree

An Ancient Tree

Autumn Brook

Autumn Brook

River Bank

River Bank

The Glen

The Glen

Swiftwater (Misty Morn)

Swiftwater (Misty Morn)

Little Stone House

Little Stone House

Moonlit Night, Winter

Moonlit Night, Winter

The Tempest

The Tempest

more paintings

 

5 Responses to “Maxfield Parrish (1870 – 1966)”

  1. Bruce said

    I checked; there is no Mazda dealership in Edison, NJ (see second “Egypt” above). There are three such dealerships in that part of New Jersey: Avenel, East Brunswick, and Greenbrook. Edison is right in the middle of all three but not close to any.

    So there is no instance of sly automobile product placement here, as I suspected (not really – I exaggerate – but it did pique my interest). Besides, although Mazda has been around since 1920, the car debuted in the US only in 1970, four years after Parrish’s passing.

    Well, with a bit of research, it turns out that there is more than one Mazda, or there used to be!

    “Mazda was a trademarked name registered by General Electric in 1909 for incandescent light bulbs. The name was used from 1909 through 1945 in the United States by General Electric and Westinghouse. Mazda brand light bulbs were made for decades after 1945 outside the USA. The company chose the name due to its association with Ahura Mazda, the transcendental and universal God of Zoroastrianism whose name means light of wisdom (Ahura = light, Mazda = wisdom) in the Avestan language.”

    But what about “Edison”? Well, “The Edison screw fitting is a system of screw mounts used for light bulbs, developed by Thomas Edison and licensed starting in 1909 under the Mazda trademark.”

    The “Edison Mazda,” then, is not a car dealership but a model of light bulb made and sold by General Electric in the first half of the 20th Century. Hmmm. Why does it appear in a picture of Ancient Egypt?

    Because it’s part of a calendar. A series of calendars, as I discovered.

    “Maxfield Parrish was asked by General Electric, via Forbes Lithograph Manufacturing Company of Boston, to design the 1918 Mazda Lamp calendar. Parrish agreed, and the calendar was so well received by the public that Parrish continued to illustrate the Mazda Lamp calendars for 17 years, until 1934.”

    That last quote is from YouTube (the others are found in Wikipedia), from the description of an excellent video sampling of these calendars. Enjoy them, and the background music, here:

    Yeah, yeah, you knew all this stuff already but I had fun discovering it! 🙂

    • Bruce said

      Interesting how, when I went back to look at the painting, I saw the light bulb in the center for the first time (my screen resolution is small and the bulb is not sharply evident). I saw it only after my research because I had “light bulb” on my mind (no puns, please) and therefore my brain processed the image for what it is, this time. Still looks weird in Ancient Egypt, though.

    • Suzay Lamb said

      My Italian great-grandfather owned a shop where, among other things, he sold light bulbs. And, among other brands, he also sold Mazda light bulbs. How do I know?…Many years later, in the basement of his house, I found a stock of Mazda light bulbs. I would certainly have preferred to find an original Parrish painting, but I’m happy though.

  2. La iluminación en The Enchanted Prince es increíble.

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