AMERICAN GALLERY

Greatest American Painters

John Sloan (1871 – 1951)

Posted by L. A. on February 17, 2013


A Woman's Work

A Woman’s Work

Carol With Red Curls

Carol With Red Curls

Jeanne Dubinsky

Jeanne Dubinsky

Sunday, Women Drying Their Hair

Sunday, Women Drying Their Hair

Sixth Avenue Elevated At Third Street

Sixth Avenue Elevated At Third Street

The Cot

The Cot

Scrubwoman

Scrubwoman

Sleeping Nude On Lavender

Sleeping Nude On Lavender

Gateway To Cerillos

Gateway To Cerillos

Music In The Plaza

Music In The Plaza

Daisy

Daisy

Nude At Piano

Nude At Piano

Sun And Wind On The Roof

Sun And Wind On The Roof

South Beach Bathers

South Beach Bathers

Six O'Clock, Winter

Six O’Clock, Winter

Helen At The Easel

Helen At The Easel

Nude, Red Hair, Standing

Nude, Red Hair, Standing

My Wife In Blue

My Wife In Blue

The Lafayette

The Lafayette

Travelling Carnival, Santa Fe

Travelling Carnival, Santa Fe

Juanita

Juanita

Spanish Girl - Fur Hat - Red Coat

Spanish Girl – Fur Hat – Red Coat

Monument In The Plaza, New York

Monument In The Plaza, New York

Sunday Afternoon In Union Square

Sunday Afternoon In Union Square

El Gallo

El Gallo

Katherine Schon

Katherine Schon

Nude

Nude

Yeats At Petitpas

Yeats At Petitpas

Self-Portrait

Self-Portrait

Self-Portrait (Pipe And Brown Jacket)

Self-Portrait (Pipe And Brown Jacket)

George Eliot

George Eliot

7 Responses to “John Sloan (1871 – 1951)”

  1. One is struck looking at Sloan’s art how often he employed those diagonal slashes,as if made with wire brush.Flaunting disregard for actual form of human body is also a discomforting.Look at the reclining nude he painted-if women really looked naked that bad no painter would ever paint them.Well-I know:it was the post-impressionism epoch and a well-informed, fashionable artist was supposed to exaggerate and distort .The effect is miserable.

    • Bruce said

      It’s odd, but although I find myself agreeing with Henryk (I tend to favor realism in art and the musculature of Lavender’s body and the mannish arms and hands of Juanita bother me) but for some reason, when I step back a bit I find this artist’s style to be pleasing overall.

  2. Bruce said

    By the way, if you think the Yeats in “Yeats At Petitpas” is the famous Irish poet William Butler Yeats, you would be off by a generation and a continent. The Yeats shown here is John Butler Yeats, William’s father, a portraitist who “was a poor businessman and was never financially secure. He moved house frequently and shifted several times between England and Ireland. At the age of 69 he moved to New York, where he was friendly with members of the Ashcan School of painters.”

    He apparently became the philosophical leader of a group of artists who hung out in a small restaurant called Petitpas on West Twenty Ninth Street in New York City. His group of friends included John Sloan.

    I found an interesting New York Times article from February 1922 about this Yeats. Quoting from it, “John Sloan, the painter, and perhaps the closest of Yeats’s many friends, once asked him why he decided to stay [in America]. ‘Because I saw a hopeful penury ahead instead of a hopeless,’ he answered. Yeats also had remarked that he did not expect to go home and live the life of father to a famous son, that he still was ‘the head of the dynasty,’ and would remain just that.”

    For an interesting glimpse of this man, his circle of followers, and his times, go to this web page and click View Full Article: http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=F60A12FE355810738DDDA00994DA405B828EF1D3

    Or, if you are lucky, go directly to the article at: http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F60A12FE355810738DDDA00994DA405B828EF1D3

  3. Bruce said

    Let me go back to Sloan himself for a minute (and sorry for the multiple comments but this was one of those posts that the more I looked at, the more I got into it).

    If you isolate and group “A Woman’s Work,” “Sunday, Women Drying Their Hair,” “Sixth Avenue Elevated At Third Street,” “Sun And Wind On The Roof,” “South Beach Bathers,” “Six O’Clock, Winter,” “The Lafayette,” (but not the two park paintings for some reason; they look vaguely European to me) as well as four other works that I found elsewhere: “McSorley’s Bar,” “Wake of the Ferry,” “Hairdressers Window,” and “The Haymarket,” you have an excellent look at everyday life in New York City at the beginning of the 20th Century. All are now in my collection.

    From Wikipedia about John French Sloan: . . . the critic Robert Hughes praised the influence of “the most lyrical, and politically acerbic of the Ashcan artists, ‘a spectator of life’, as he called himself. Sloan’s work had an honest humaneness, a frank sympathy, he refused to flatten lower-class New Yorkers into stereotypes of misery, and his strong sense of the moments in which ordinary people are seen unawares, or isolated, was to deeply affect the leading artist of the next generation, Edward Hopper.”

    Well, gee. No wonder I liked this artist’s style. Edward Hopper is one of my favorite painters of all.

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