Greatest American Painters

William McGregor Paxton (1869 – 1941)

Posted by A. S. Amberson on July 29, 2012

The New Necklace

Eleanor Anne Schrafft

Glow Of Gold, Gleam Of Pearl

The Note – Mrs. Ernest Major

title unknown

Elizabeth Blaney


Cherry – The Gay Nineties

Girl Combing Her Hair

The Chinese Parasol

The Yellow Jacket

Helen Smith Beyer (Mrs. Henry Gustav Beyer)

Mollie Scott And Dorothy Tay

Portrait of Elizabeth

The Canary

Caroline Elizabeth Stewart


The Breakfast


The Album

The Green Dress

The Figurine

Diana Of The Peaks

Woman Sewing

The Daguerreotype

Henry Gustav Bejer jr

Seated Nude With Sculpture

The Letter

La Russe

The White Veranda

The Red Fan – Mrs. William Paxton

Rose And Blue

Mr. Charles Sinkler

The Golden Veil

Girl Sweeping

title unknown

title unknown


other paintings


3 Responses to “William McGregor Paxton (1869 – 1941)”

  1. Bruce said

    His nudes have a vague featurelessness to them as if, though he may have been required or felt compelled to paint them, he really didn’t want to do so.

    • Bruce said

      Or he was trying to shield his subjects in some manner, perhaps to preserve their dignity or chastity.

      • vincenzo said

        Generally, in painting, classic nudes or academic put in reliev only the construction and form, and consequently the subjects assume a statuesque appearance and chaste. Moreover, this is also detectable in the statuary of classical Greece, where it is possible see that the various goddesses, even if they were shown naked to the bathroom or in other circumstances, are distinguished by their formal beauty and naturalness, and also for their chaste appearance. Paxton, in my opinion, as I mentioned in the previous selection, offered by American Gallery, was an impressionist particular, very interested in photographic technique, especially in portraits and interior scenes. A technique pioneered by masters such as Albrecht Durer, Johannes Vermeer and also by Edgar Degas (chronologically nearest to Paxton). The effect of nudes flat and monotonous executed by Paxton, perhaps depends from the photographic tecnique, but we must recognize that with the same technique, the artist has done some wonderful portraits and interior scenes.

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