AMERICAN GALLERY

Greatest American Painters

Tom Lovell (1909 – 1997)

Posted by Suzay Lamb on February 23, 2013


Back Comes The Bride

Back Comes The Bride

At The Window

At The Window

title unknown

title unknown

Saratoga Trunk

Saratoga Trunk

Blue Hour

Blue Hour

It's Raining

It’s Raining

Occupation Of Paris

Occupation Of Paris

Up The Staircase

Up The Staircase

title unknown

title unknown

Dark Lady

Dark Lady

Love In The Midst

Love In The Midst

On The Rocks

On The Rocks

title unknown

title unknown

In The Garden

In The Garden

title unknown

title unknown

Shot In The Dark

Shot In The Dark

The Name Is Betty

The Name Is Betty

The Beach

The Beach

The Disappearance Of Mary Drake

The Disappearance Of Mary Drake

The Music Teacher

The Music Teacher

The Conversation

The Conversation

title unknown

title unknown

Boy And Girl Riding Horse

Boy And Girl Riding Horse

Love On The Nile

Love On The Nile

Water Cart

Water Cart

Party Scene

Party Scene

Balloonists Struggle To Escape A Doomed Gondola

Balloonists Struggle To Escape A Doomed Gondola

As Easy To Love

As Easy To Love

title unknown

title unknown

Memoirs Of Casanova

Memoirs Of Casanova

Light Beer

Light Beer

Halloween Party

Halloween Party

more paintings

 

6 Responses to “Tom Lovell (1909 – 1997)”

  1. Bruce said

    Another Saturday, another round of “Free Association” with an artist’s collection posted here. Thoughts that come immediately to mind as I view each image. Here goes:

    “Back Comes The Bride” – She’s remembering her wedding day.

    “At The Window” – The use of light makes this a dramatic scene. There is a confrontation about to happen.

    “title unknown” – She is not being comforted, despite his attempt.

    “Saratoga Trunk” – What is the purpose of the little fellow here, do you think? Why did the artist include him? Also, that is quite a bustle on the rear-end of the older lady, yes? Or is that indeed the “Trunk”? Heh.

    “Blue Hour” – There is an optimal amount of kids but the number varies by mother. This one seems to have exceeded her quota.

    “It’s Raining” – Lady: “I told you so! Next time, listen to me.”

    “Occupation Of Paris” – What a great portrayal of the bitterness and hatred for the Nazis on the woman’s face. Can she cover that baby up any more protectively?

    “Up The Staircase” – to Paradise, that is. Ooh la la.

    “title unknown” – This girl is definitely in trouble.

    “Dark Lady” – That being the seated one, whom I suspect is the spoiler. Meanwhile, the man seems more concerned about the commotion being made by the blonde.

    “Love In The Midst” – of laughter at the hat, that is. “Dear, you do look ridiculous. Please leave it home next time.”

    “On The Rocks” – What could be on the rocks here is green bathing suit’s romance for yellow trunks. Body language indicates he likes blondie instead.

    “title unknown” – Interesting back story here; I just wish I knew what it is. Is the KKK after this white woman, her man, or her hired help?

    “In The Garden” – “Don’t tell him I’m here!” Also, those are remarkably modern-looking shoes.

    “title unknown” – You do what he did, you end up sleeping with the fishes.

    “Shot In The Dark” – Somebody better stop messing with this pistol-packing mama!

    “The Name Is Betty” – I swear, this looks like a scene from Only Angels Have Wings (1939) with Cary Grant and Jean Arthur that I just saw on TCM yesterday!

    http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/27933/Only-Angels-Have-Wings/

    “The Beach” – Three is the right number of kids for this mother, see?

    “The Disappearance Of Mary Drake” – “Jonny refused to admit that his mother would ever be a problem…Priscilla knew better.” [All right, I cheated on this one. The line is from a story of the same title that was published in McCalls Magazine in June, 1952.]

    “The Music Teacher” – Looks like a tough job ahead.

    “The Conversation” – “Boy trouble” if I ever did see it. [As if I knew what I was talking about.]

    “title unknown” – Gosh, you would have to be one heck of an interesting woman to totally engage his attention with that distraction going on in the background!

    “Boy And Girl Riding Horse” – Heaven, just like I pictured it.

    “Love On The Nile” – Peek-a-boo!

    “Water Cart” – This one reminds me of the other collection of Tom Lovell that you posted in December, the historically themed works that I admired.

    “Party Scene” – I never get invited to parties like this one. Why is that?

    “Balloonists Struggle To Escape A Doomed Gondola” – This one resonates with me because I just finished reading “The Mysterious Island” by Jules Verne. Another painting of which I wish I knew the story. This past December, the original of this illustration was offered at Christie’s “The National Geographic Collection: The Art of Exploration” auction.

    “As Easy To Love” – As what? Never mind, no need to specify. I know what he means.

    “title unknown” – “You promised him Santa would bring him THIS?!?”

    “Memoirs Of Casanova” – Times sure change (as I guess they should in 250 years). This is the most famous “womanizer” of all time? Yeesh.

    “Light Beer” – Take if from me, an aficionado of beer. Even if it’s lite, you do NOT share a beer with three other guys. It simply is not done. This situation must be settled by a hand of poker, or maybe a Rock Paper Scissors mini-tournament.

    “Halloween Party” – Again, where the heck is my invitation? Hmmm. The jack-o-lanterns seem to know what is going to happen next!

  2. Sherif Gharib said

    So perfect really good

  3. Very nice and real atmosphere such as in a movie scene!

    Beautiful I share it

  4. Bruce said

    You know, as a test, I go over this again and have the same instantaneous responses. I am so NARROW MINDED. I am unworthy of this blog! :)

  5. Bruce said

    Yeesh. So much for my budding career as art critic. Heh.

  6. Suzay Lamb said

    Your instantaneous responses always crack me up :)

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